HIV, AIDS and sexually transmitted infections - care, support and prevention - AIDS action  

HIV, AIDS and sexually transmitted infections - care, support and prevention - AIDS action

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  care, support and prevention

 

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 HIV, AIDS and sexually transmitted infections - care, support and prevention - AIDS action
 

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Starting the discussion: steps to making sex safer
  >  Part 5: Teaching tools 
This section as pdf  555 kbThis section in pdf format


Part 5: Teaching tools

Starting the Discussion: Steps to Making Sex Safer

Acknowledgements
Understanding people's behaviour
Communicating for change
Working with groups
Assessing change
Teaching tools
Check your facts
Resource list

 

 

 

Starting the discussion: steps to making sex safer    61  Page 62  63  top of page

  Part 5: Teaching tools

 

Communicating is much easier if-we use teaching aids. A teaching aid can be described as a tool for the job. It does not do the job but it helps us to do it better. There are different kinds of teaching tools:
 

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visual aids - something seen e. g. posters, flannelgraphs, slides, flip charts

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audio aids - something heard e. g. songs or stories

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audio-visual aids - something seen and heard e.g. films, video, drama

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models and games - something touched or played with.


Teaching aids are used in the communication process to:
 

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focus attention on a simple message e. g. a poster

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carry detailed information e.g. a wall chart

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invite participation by the group e.g. a picture code

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increase understanding and reinforce learning e.g. a film, video or game


It is important to check whether people understand the message you are trying to present. Before producing the final copy of a poster or game, or showing a video, check with a few people that the message is clear.



    

Starting the discussion: steps to making sex safer    62  Page 63  64  top of page

  Part 5: Teaching tools

Posters

Posters cannot give much information and should present one easily understood message. They can be read and understood very quickly without the spoken or written word.

Suggestions for making a good poster

Do:
 

Do use the KISS rule (Keep It Short and Simple) - single message illustrations are best
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use the KISS rule (Keep It Short and Simple) - single message illustrations are best

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ensure that the message fits the picture

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always emphasise the positive

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use clear line drawings or silhouettes and avoid distracting background details

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use words only if your audience is literate

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keep the print size bold and large

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ensure that drawings are recognisable and familiar to the target group.


Avoid:
 

Avoid messages that create fear and panic
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messages that create fear and panic

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colours which are not easily seen such as yellow

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symbols such as ticks, crosses and abstract drawings that cannot be easily understood

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'close-up' illustrations which only show part of the body and therefore may be difficult to understand.



Displaying posters
 

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Put the poster where it can be seen easily

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Choose a clear space so that the poster attracts the most attention. Avoid walls covered with lots of other posters.

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Try to select a place where the poster will be protected from sun, wind and rain.

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Position the poster at eye level.



    

Starting the discussion: steps to making sex safer    63  Page 64  65  top of page

  Part 5: Teaching tools

Wall charts

Wall charts contain more information than posters and are therefore displayed for referral over a long period of time. They usually contain information which is shown in symbols and diagrams. They are not very commonly used in AIDS education, and more often for training trainers or health workers.

 

Wall charts contain more information than posters and are therefore displayed for referral over a long period of time.

Picture codes

Picture codes are similar to posters in size but different in content. They portray a situation which stimulates strong feelings and are used to provoke discussion (see page 41).

Videos

Videos are often used in AIDS education. They are especially useful when they give an account of a real situation, familiar to the group. If a trainer who is open about having HIV infection cannot take part in the group session, then videos involving people with HIV can be a good way to encourage acceptance and understanding.

A good video should entertain and educate. Unfortunately videos are often used as an alternative to group activities by under-confident trainers. A video is just a tool for teaching and should be followed by group discussion.



    

Starting the discussion: steps to making sex safer    64  Page 65  66  top of page

  Part 5: Teaching tools

 

Guidelines for presentation 
 

Watch the video beforehand, and note places where you could stop it and discuss specific points.

Write up or give questions for people to consider while they watch the video. Discuss the responses at the end.

Combine discussion with role plays - for example, acting out one of the situations shown in the video.

Flannelgraphs

A flannelgraph consists of a board covered with cloth, and cloth pictures of parts of the body or people. These images can be put in different positions on the board, and moved around to represent changing events or a story. Pictures of parts of the body can be used to explain processes of sexual development and reproduction.
 

A flannelgraph consists of a board covered with cloth, and cloth pictures of parts of the body or people.



    

 

 

 
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